Posts Tagged ‘Reframing’

By Cecilia Fabre, M.A. Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes, 29 seconds

Edgar, a child of five, is the oldest son of a marriage that has lived with great economic and family pressures. The mother began going to therapy two years ago for her distress because of her pregnancy. She left treatment. A short while later, she asked for an emergency appointment. She told me by phone that she had just gotten Edgar out of the hospital, and he did not want to return home because he was afraid of his father who, in an attack of fury and impatience, had hit him against the wall, fracturing his cranium.

I met with the whole family in therapy because that permitted me to understand the family situation, to perceive their emotions, and to explore their resources. Once I have an idea of the family structure and the context in which the problem occurred, I can tell a story (or build a story together with the children) that represents the problem and different solutions. In an abuse situation, it is necessary to censure actions, not the persons implicated, trying to see them as parents who make mistakes. In this case, I constructed the story because the child was immobile in a chair, not wanting to look at anyone, much less participate. → Read more

By Steve Andreas, M.A. Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes, 49 seconds 

A woman told Milton Erickson about her eight-year-old daughter, Ruth, who hated EVERYBODY:

A very MISERABLE kind of girl. I (Erickson) asked the mother what she thought made the girl hate herself and everybody else.

The mother said, “Her face is a solid freckle. And the kids call her, “Freckles.” → Read more

By Norma Barretta, Ph.D. & Philip Barretta, M.A Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes, 1 second 

The very first time we met with Milton Erickson there were just five people present: Three physicians and the two of us sitting with the awesome Dr. Erickson. A woman walked into the room with her husband. She wanted to be hypnotized so that she could comfortably pass a licensure examination free from the anxiety often generated by such a test.

Erickson asked her husband if he was a qualified professional with a degree. The husband nodded his head affirmatively and said, “I have a Bachelor’s degree in Engineering.”

Dr. Erickson’s response surprised all of us: “You’ll have to leave. Come back in an hour.” → Read more