Posts Tagged ‘Innovative Psychotherapy’

Written By Joyce Bavlinka, M.Ed., LISAC Estimated Reading Time: 7 minutes, 39 seconds

While sorting through the Foundation’s book collection, I came across several books that were autographed by Erickson. Two of the three autographed books we found were autographed to T.E.A. von Dedenroth. The name intrigued me, as well as Erickson’s quirky messages. Who was T.E.A. von Dedenroth and how was he a part of Erickson‘s story? → Read more

By Jeffrey Zeig Estimated Reading Time: 2 minutes, 15 seconds

I never met anyone who could make a human connection as intently as Virginia Satir. She did this when working with clients; she did it with her colleagues, and she did it when she was on stage. I remember one keynote that she offered in Phoenix at one of the Erickson Foundation conferences. People left the room marveling and commenting. Many said she was talking directly to them. I thought she was talking to me. → Read more

By John D. Lentz, D.Min. Estimated Reading Time: 6 minutes, 28 seconds

John Lentz: Lilian, we have known each other for some time, and you have been teaching the Intensives for many years. I browsed the Erickson website and discovered that the Intensives program has changed a lot.

Lilian Borges: Yes, but I have been positively surprised at the outcome. My first class was last week. Each class is now two hours long and I had to be trained to teach others because the Foundation is using a whole different system. There are now modules: A through D on different topics. → Read more

Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes, 12 seconds

For over 25 years, the Couples Conference has helped professionals learn the applications of the latest research on facilitating treatment with couples. With the world going through a global pandemic, we as people have had to learn to rely more on virtual settings. As a result, the Milton H. Erickson Foundation and the Couples Institute still plan to hold the Couples Conference online, so you can continue your education with couples therapy work and in turn, be able to connect with and help your patients with couples related issues. → Read more

Estimated Reading Time: 2 minutes, 19 seconds

Forty-one years ago, on March 25, 1980, Milton H. Erickson, MD passed away. On that day we remember the genius life of Milton Erickson and the innovative techniques, powerful wisdom, and inspiration he passed on to so many people.

Milton Erickson suffered from many physical ailments from contracting polio at a young age and then being diagnosed with post-polio syndrome. Instead of letting his condition get the best of him, he turned it into a positive, powered through, and used it to further help his patients with their own struggles. He became known as the quintessential “Wounded Healer.” → Read more

Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes, 8 seconds

 Milton Erickson is known as one of the pioneering psychotherapists of the 21st century. The Milton H. Erickson Foundation has content surrounding this genius man that is free and available for purchase. From countless books, exciting streaming content, online reading material, and more, we have everything you need to learn about Milton Erickson. Whether you are just learning about him for the first time and don’t know where to start or are an experienced Ericksonian eager to get your hands on more material, you can’t go wrong. Here we have compiled a list of resources we have available to help you on this journey. → Read more

By Vladimir Zelinka Estimated Reading Time: 12 minutes, 53 seconds 

Vladimir Zelinka: Could you please talk about the role creativity plays in your therapy?

Jeff Zeig: I am creative in my therapy because I want my patients to be creatively empowered. If you are living creatively, then you are leading a fulfilling life with meaning.

The therapist can be in a creative state to mirror, model, and demonstrate that therapy becomes a reference experience for creative living. A medicalized procedure follows an algorithmic path to achieve a stated goal. But therapy is a heuristic process, a creative innovation for being a better person. → Read more

By Cloé Madanes Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes, 33 seconds 

The voice of the man on the phone was cracked and old. He and his wife were in their seventies and for 20 years the family had not been able to have a Christmas, a birthday, or any celebration together. There were four children and it was the enmity and resentment from Melissa, now 40- years old, to Michael, now 45, that precluded any type of family gathering. Melissa had announced, at age 20, that Michael had sexually molested her from the time she was ten until she was fourteen. Ever since then the family had been torn apart.

Melissa led an isolated life. She had never been in a relationship with a man and she had never even had a roommate. She was a lawyer but had never practiced and worked sporadically at jobs that were beneath her education. She attributed all this to her abuse by Michael. → Read more

The following was a Christmas gift from Mrs. Erickson to Jeff Zeig in 1986. Mrs. Erickson wrote this to Zeig, penned by hand.

It is her account of Milton Erickson’s extraordinary talent in being able to diagnosis a psychiatric patient by looking at the art he or she produced:

“Milton was always deeply interested in the manner in which neurotic and psychotic symptomatology, and ways of experiencing and interpreting the world, were manifested in the artistic productions of the artist. → Read more

By Steve Andreas, MA Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes, 57 seconds 

Cathy was a 55–year-old single client of a colleague. Her initial complaint was that, although she was very competent in her work, she repeatedly raged at her boss and at coworkers. It soon emerged that she had a history of sexual abuse from her father, and had a very difficult time separating her own experience from others. Hence, it was hard for her to know her own needs, and defend herself from the expectations and intrusions from others. She showed what is often called “codependence,” or “enmeshment.” My colleague had done a lot of work with her intermittently over a period of several years, and she had made a lot of progress, but they had reached a plateau.

Cathy’s sense of herself was still wobbly and unclear, and she often felt numb, as if she were “just going through the motions,” and she wanted to feel “solid in my skin.” My colleague knew that one of my specialties was working with self-concept, so she asked me to do a session with Cathy while she observed. → Read more