Posts Tagged ‘Grief’

By Jeffrey K. Zeig, Ph.D. Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes, 33 seconds

I have published many stories of my time with Dr. Milton Erickson, many of which appear in the book Experiencing Erickson (1985, Taylor & Francis Group). These stories can help therapists take some of Erickson’s innovations and bring them into their clinical practice. → Read more

By Maria Escalante Cortina, M.A., DDS Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes, 15 seconds 

After reading “The Indigo Children” (Carroll and Tober, 1999) I realized these children would be helped by utilizing Ericksonian Psychotherapy. Utilization is a fundamental premise of this therapy. It is important for anyone, and certainly for children, that attributes and qualities be used instead of productively being labeled “faults.” Additionally, as Haley says in “Jay Haley on Milton H. Erickson,” (pp. 39, 1993. Brunner/Mazel, N.Y.) Erickson often used metaphors to help people of diverse views. In this way, they could more easily discover their own ideas. This concept led me to think about ways for helping the “Indigo Children.” → Read more

Edited by Ernest Lawrence Rossi, Ph.D., Roxanna Erickson-Klein, Ph.D. and Kathryn Lane Rossi, Ph.D. Estimated Reading Time: 2 minutes, 5 seconds

This is an excerpt extracted from Volume 3 of The Collected Works of Milton H. Erickson and highlights one of the many brilliant conversations Milton Erickson and Ernest Rossi shared together. All the volumes of The Collected Works of Milton H. Erickson are available at our online store.

Rossi: So your hypnotherapy is almost the exact opposite of most conventional hypnotic approaches. Other hypnotherapists believe they have to specify exactly what the patient is supposed to do. But you just open a patient up to knowledge that is within, together with new life experiences, rather than trying to program him with your version of how you believe he ought to behave.

Erickson: Too many hypnotherapists take you out to dinner and then tell you what to order. I take a patient out to a psychotherapeutic dinner and I say, “You give your order.” The patient makes his own selection of the food he wants. He is not hindered by my instructions, which would only obstruct and confuse his inner process.  → Read more

By Beatriz Pol, Msc. Psicoterapia Positiva Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes, 14 seconds

I recently had a short but effective experience with Dr. Greenleaf that impacted me both personally and professionally.

At the end of a workshop on hypnotherapy, I asked Dr. Greenleaf if he could help relieve my symptoms of allergic rhinitis with hypnotherapy. This condition caused me a lot of discomfort because I could not breathe freely during the workshop exercises. He kindly told me that he did not have enough time for a full session, but he did offer some suggestions. → Read more

By Jeffrey K. Zeig Estimated Reading Time: 0 minutes, 45 seconds

This is an excerpt from the Milton Erickson Biography and taken from the contribution by Philip and Norma Barretta. 

On one occasion when Norma and Philip were meeting with Erickson, someone in the group asked Erickson a question about smoking. According to Norma, at that moment, Erickson coughed – and he continued coughing for the next half hour — in between words, phrases, and sentences. → Read more

By Betty Alice Erickson, M.S., L.P.C. Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes, 33 seconds 

To be in Milton Erickson’s pres­ence was to invite him to teach. And teach he did! Almost everyone who spent time with him can remember precisely the words he said that changed life forevermore. Even people who read his words often comment that “his voice goes with them.”

I am fortunate that when I think of my father, I vividly remember many times when just a few words changed me instantly. In this case, Dad and a family friend, Margaret Mead, worked in tandem. Although the event and words are crystal clear, I don’t remember who said what-they complimented each other beautifully. → Read more

By Jeffrey K. Zeig Estimated Reading Time: 10 minutes, 1 second 

In December of 1973, when I was 26 years old and had recently earned a master’s degree in clinical psychology, I met Milton Erickson. I was working in the San Francisco Bay Area as a couples and family counselor and serendipitously the opportunity to visit Dr. Erickson presented itself. (The transcript of this initial meeting is in my book, Experiencing Erickson, Zeig, 1985.) → Read more

By Suzanna A. Black, PsyD Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes, 40 seconds 

Recently, I began experiencing stabbing ear pain, shortness of breath, a dry cough, unremitting headaches, and signs of high blood pressure. The online doctor told me I needed to go to the ER right away.

At the ER, tears welled in my eyes and I was anxious. I had taken a COVID-19 nasal swab test and spent six hours in the ER waiting and wondering. I tried to reach a calm state, but I was scared. → Read more

By Cecilia Fabre, M.A. Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes, 29 seconds

Edgar, a child of five, is the oldest son of a marriage that has lived with great economic and family pressures. The mother began going to therapy two years ago for her distress because of her pregnancy. She left treatment. A short while later, she asked for an emergency appointment. She told me by phone that she had just gotten Edgar out of the hospital, and he did not want to return home because he was afraid of his father who, in an attack of fury and impatience, had hit him against the wall, fracturing his cranium.

I met with the whole family in therapy because that permitted me to understand the family situation, to perceive their emotions, and to explore their resources. Once I have an idea of the family structure and the context in which the problem occurred, I can tell a story (or build a story together with the children) that represents the problem and different solutions. In an abuse situation, it is necessary to censure actions, not the persons implicated, trying to see them as parents who make mistakes. In this case, I constructed the story because the child was immobile in a chair, not wanting to look at anyone, much less participate. → Read more

By Cloé Madanes Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes, 33 seconds 

The voice of the man on the phone was cracked and old. He and his wife were in their seventies and for 20 years the family had not been able to have a Christmas, a birthday, or any celebration together. There were four children and it was the enmity and resentment from Melissa, now 40- years old, to Michael, now 45, that precluded any type of family gathering. Melissa had announced, at age 20, that Michael had sexually molested her from the time she was ten until she was fourteen. Ever since then the family had been torn apart.

Melissa led an isolated life. She had never been in a relationship with a man and she had never even had a roommate. She was a lawyer but had never practiced and worked sporadically at jobs that were beneath her education. She attributed all this to her abuse by Michael. → Read more