Posts Tagged ‘Family Therapy’

By Rev. John Lentz D.Min. Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes, 15 seconds

Dr. Lentz is the Director of the Ericksonian Institute of Jeffersonville, Indiana, and Pastor of Radcliff Presbyterian Church. He is the retired Chief Chaplain of the Kentucky Correctional Institution for Women and Adjunct Professor of Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary.

It has been my experience that Dr. Erickson’s work has helped many people in ministry. While the following are personal experiences and observations, I believe they are representative of how people from a faith perspective are drawn to Erickson’s work. I’m grateful to be sharing these experiences with you to highlight Erickson’s impact on my approach to ministry and counseling. → Read more

By Jeffrey K. Zeig Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes, 59 seconds 

The following is an excerpt from the biography on Milton Erickson and was taken from an interview with Paul Lounsbury and Nancy Winston in May 1993.

Paul C. Lounsbury and Nancy Winston were married from 1987 to 2003. They live in New York. Lounsbury is a marriage and family therapist and Winston is a clinical social worker and therapist. → Read more

By Milton Erickson Estimated Reading Time: 7 minutes, 21 seconds

I have been asked to make a recording of an induction technique. After much thought on this matter, I believe I can be of much more service in another way. My own induction techniques are expressive of me, of my timing, of my rhythm, my personality, my emotional feeling, my attitude toward my patient. So it is with anybody else, and so it should be with anybody else. An induction technique is not a series of words, phrases, sentences. Nor is it just a matter of suggestions, intonations, inflections, pauses, and hesitations. An induction is both simply and complexly a matter of communication of ideas and understandings and attitudes by the doctor to his patient. → Read more

By Betty Alice Erickson, M.S., L.P.C. Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes, 33 seconds 

To be in Milton Erickson’s pres­ence was to invite him to teach. And teach he did! Almost everyone who spent time with him can remember precisely the words he said that changed life forevermore. Even people who read his words often comment that “his voice goes with them.”

I am fortunate that when I think of my father, I vividly remember many times when just a few words changed me instantly. In this case, Dad and a family friend, Margaret Mead, worked in tandem. Although the event and words are crystal clear, I don’t remember who said what-they complimented each other beautifully. → Read more

By Jeffrey K. Zeig, Ph.D. Estimated Reading Time: 9 minutes, 3 seconds 

Milton Erickson was undoubtedly a master technician, but the humanistic element he added to his therapy made it even more powerful.

When I first visited Erickson in 1973, he was working with a patient I will call John, who probably had been diagnosed a paranoid schizophrenic when he was hospitalized. *Erickson used brief therapy with John, in that it was strategically targeted, although the therapy took place over the span of several decades. → Read more

By Cecilia Fabre, M.A. Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes, 29 seconds

Edgar, a child of five, is the oldest son of a marriage that has lived with great economic and family pressures. The mother began going to therapy two years ago for her distress because of her pregnancy. She left treatment. A short while later, she asked for an emergency appointment. She told me by phone that she had just gotten Edgar out of the hospital, and he did not want to return home because he was afraid of his father who, in an attack of fury and impatience, had hit him against the wall, fracturing his cranium.

I met with the whole family in therapy because that permitted me to understand the family situation, to perceive their emotions, and to explore their resources. Once I have an idea of the family structure and the context in which the problem occurred, I can tell a story (or build a story together with the children) that represents the problem and different solutions. In an abuse situation, it is necessary to censure actions, not the persons implicated, trying to see them as parents who make mistakes. In this case, I constructed the story because the child was immobile in a chair, not wanting to look at anyone, much less participate. → Read more

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Jul 29

Mary

By Richard Landis, Ph.D. Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes, 47 seconds 

Mary was a 44-year-old, white female who was referred to me for pervasive, lifetime anxiety. Mary remembered frequent events of feel­ing fearful and alone as a child with her negative, gloom-and-doom father and with her controlling and abusive first husband whom she had divorced fifteen years earlier. She was unable to express any opinions that disagreed with her father’s. While her current marriage was to a very supportive man, it was a highly regimented and structured relationship with little spontaneity and fun.

It seemed to me that Mary had no confidence in her ability to endure making mistakes. I wanted her to experience the difference between what she saw as disrespectful viola­tion of artificial perspectives and demands created by her father and ex­-husband and the whimsical bending of norms. → Read more

By María Pía Allende Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes, 52 seconds

I am from Argentina, and my first encounter with hypnosis was watching Tusam, a stage hypnotist who swallowed glass and put a dog in trance.

I was the executive director of MRI when we added Ericksonian hypnosis to our international externship program. Dr. Eric Greenleaf became our teacher. Later, after leaving MRI, I consulted with his institute. I translated courses and trances, but I had never been in trance. Hypnosis scared me. → Read more

By Susan Reuling Furness, M.Ed., LCPC, LMFT, PTR Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes, 8 seconds 

Frigid rain peppers hard blackened snow. You continue to season my thoughts.

When I saw her in the waiting room last March I knew the lymphoma had recurred. She’d aged. Her shrunken profile barely stirred the air as she walked into my office. Undaunted, she wanted to write more of her memoir. As a Registered Poetry Therapist, I offer healing trances through spontaneous free writing and bibliotherapy, as well as hypnosis.

I met Abby several years ago in my poetry therapy group. To continue the work she began then, we agreed to meet in my office, unless the chemotherapy was debilitating, in which case we’d met at her home. → Read more

Milton Erickson’s Teaching Seminar From the Erickson Archives Estimated Reading Time: 2 minutes, 24 seconds 

Erickson speaking to a group of students:

A patient came to me and said, “I weigh 180 pounds. I’ve dieted a hundred times down to 130 pounds. As soon as the scale reads 130, I celebrate by going to the kitchen and stuffing myself and I gain back to 180 pounds in an awful hurry. And I’ve done that hundreds of times. Can you help with hypnosis?”

“I doubt if she did it hundreds of times. She said, ‘I diet down 130 pounds, then I celebrate by gaining it all back again. I told her, ‘Yes, I can help you by hypnosis, but to do so you’ll have to promise me that you’ll do whatever I tell you to do. No matter what it is you promise me, you’ll do it.’ I made her promise me in a waking state. I got the same promise in a trance state. And I explained to her in the trance state and the waking state, “You have gained your weight to 180 and you diet and lose to 130 pounds, and then you gain it back. Now what you’re going to do this time is you’re going to do your weight gain first and have your reduction second. So, you will now gain from 180 to 200 pounds.’ And with every ounce she gained, she wanted me to let her start reducing. I held out for 200 pounds on my scales and then gave her permission to reduce. She reduced in a hurry to 130 pounds and stayed there. I took her pattern and reversed it.” → Read more