Posts Tagged ‘Family Therapy’

Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes, 12 seconds

For over 25 years, the Couples Conference has helped professionals learn the applications of the latest research on facilitating treatment with couples. With the world going through a global pandemic, we as people have had to learn to rely more on virtual settings. As a result, the Milton H. Erickson Foundation and the Couples Institute still plan to hold the Couples Conference online, so you can continue your education with couples therapy work and in turn, be able to connect with and help your patients with couples related issues. → Read more

By Richard Landis, Ph.D. Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes, 53 seconds

Jack was a 35-year-old accountant who was terrified of being wrong or criticized. He initially came in requesting help with his ten-year-old son, Nathan. Homework was a constant battle. Jack would show Nathan how to do it the right way and Nathan would want to do it his own way. Jack complained that if Nathan would do it the right way, the homework would be finished within half an hour. This would allow Jack to enjoy a quiet evening reading the beloved hardback mystery books he collected. → Read more

By Jeffrey K. Zeig, Ph.D. Reviewed by Rubin Battino, M.S. Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes, 11 seconds

What are Psychoaerobic Exercises, and why are they useful in training therapists and empowering excellence? In his most recent book, Psychoaerobics: An Experiential Method to Empower Therapist Excellence, Jeffrey Zeig emphasizes conceptual rather than factual learning. That is, one “knows” a fact, but one has a “felt sense” of a concept. Thus, his Psychoaerobic Exercises are all designed to be experiential rather than cognitive. People learn most deeply by feeling, sensing, and doing. Zeig states categorically: “The consultation room is the theater of the conceptual.” It is not a lecture hall where facts are stated. “It is the job of the therapist to strengthen positive concepts and modify ineffective, negative concepts.” The exercises can then be described as mini-psychodramas done in a group setting where all the participants are engaged experientially. You do not learn how to play tennis or a musical instrument by observing, but by repetitive practice under the guidance of a professional. → Read more

Estimated Reading Time: 2 minutes, 19 seconds

Forty-one years ago, on March 25, 1980, Milton H. Erickson, MD passed away. On that day we remember the genius life of Milton Erickson and the innovative techniques, powerful wisdom, and inspiration he passed on to so many people.

Milton Erickson suffered from many physical ailments from contracting polio at a young age and then being diagnosed with post-polio syndrome. Instead of letting his condition get the best of him, he turned it into a positive, powered through, and used it to further help his patients with their own struggles. He became known as the quintessential “Wounded Healer.” → Read more

Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes, 8 seconds

 Milton Erickson is known as one of the pioneering psychotherapists of the 21st century. The Milton H. Erickson Foundation has content surrounding this genius man that is free and available for purchase. From countless books, exciting streaming content, online reading material, and more, we have everything you need to learn about Milton Erickson. Whether you are just learning about him for the first time and don’t know where to start or are an experienced Ericksonian eager to get your hands on more material, you can’t go wrong. Here we have compiled a list of resources we have available to help you on this journey. → Read more

By Michele Ritterman, Ph.D. Estimated Reading Time: 2 minutes, 42 seconds

Milton and Elizabeth Erickson’s professional collaboration didn’t stop with their early papers on time distortion. During Milton’s last seven years, when I was a frequent visitor to the Erickson household and office, Betty was very much involved in all aspects of his work. After I had my first baby and was pregnant with the second, Betty took care of my daughter for a whole morning so that I could have uninterrupted time with Milton. The rapport between Milton and Betty and her involvement was as important to me as my direct studies with Milton. → Read more

Reviewed By: John Lentz, D. Min Estimated Reading Time: 1 minute, 24 seconds

This is a review of one of the many videos from The Erickson Video Collection.

“I have watched this hour-long video several times now and each time I gleaned more learnings. I am only beginning to grasp the wisdom of Erickson’s understanding of trauma. But despite its complexity, Jeff Zeig makes it much easier to understand with his insightful commentary. → Read more

By Milton H. Erickson, M.D.

From the Erickson Archives

Estimated Reading Time: 7 minutes, 42 seconds 

I have been asked to make a recording of an induction technique. After much thought on this matter, I believe I can be of much more service in another way. My own induction techniques are expressive to me, of my timing, of my rhythm, my personality, my emotional feeling, my attitude toward my patient. So it is with anybody else, and so it should be with anybody else. An induction technique is not a series of words, phrases, or sentences. Nor is it just a matter of suggestions, intentions, inflections, pauses, and hesitations. An induction technique is both simply and complexly a matter of communication of ideas and understandings and attitudes by the doctor to his patient. → Read more

By Rubin Battino, M.S. Estimated Reading Time: 7 minutes, 21 seconds

Estelle is a friend who at age 75 was diagnosed with breast cancer. She knew that I had done volunteer work with people who have life­ threatening diseases. The first session was devoted to going over the kinds of things I do to help people. For instance, teaching them how to relax and meditate, guided imagery for healing, and asking direct questions about living wills and medical treat­ment. Considering the information Estelle provided, I prepared two 15-minute guided imagery tapes for her.

I used the first session to elicit information about past surgical expe­riences and any fears Estelle had about the upcoming surgery. I told her about research which indicated that while under anesthesia patients can hear what is said in the operating room. Using the information she gave to me I led her through a hypnotic session centered on preparation for surgery. → Read more

By Maria Escalante Cortina, M.A., DDS Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes, 15 seconds 

After reading “The Indigo Children” (Carroll and Tober, 1999) I realized these children would be helped by utilizing Ericksonian Psychotherapy. Utilization is a fundamental premise of this therapy. It is important for anyone, and certainly for children, that attributes and qualities be used instead of productively being labeled “faults.” Additionally, as Haley says in “Jay Haley on Milton H. Erickson,” (pp. 39, 1993. Brunner/Mazel, N.Y.) Erickson often used metaphors to help people of diverse views. In this way, they could more easily discover their own ideas. This concept led me to think about ways for helping the “Indigo Children.” → Read more